#31: Sacroiliac Boop by the Happy Feeling

City: Calgary, AB
Radio Station: CKXL
Peak Month: December 1970
Peak Position in Calgary ~ #4
Peak position in Vancouver ~ did not chart
Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 ~ did not chart
YouTube: “Sacroiliac Boop
Lyrics: “Sacroiliac Boop”

Happy Feeling was a band from Calgary, Alberta. They formed in the late 60s. Gordie Moffat played bass guitar, keyboards, harmonica, lead and backing vocals. Bob Moffat played  rhythm guitar, lead guitar, keyboards, percussion, and backing vocals. Jim Aiello played keyboards, and was the frontman and lead vocalist for the band. Bruce Frost played bass guitar. Gerry Mudry was the bands’ drummer, and Dan Ferguson played lead guitar, and shared lead and backing vocals.

On September 21, 1968, the Calgary Herald ran a story with the headline “Rock Bands To Aid United Fund: Gigantic Teen Show Here Sunday.” AM-pop radio station CKXL was hosting the event featuring Edmonton recording acts Barry Allan and the Purple Haze. Bands from Calgary included The Other Side, Gainsborough Gallery and the Happy Feeling. “The Happy Feeling is a group of six very talented musicians, who already have a great performance record behind them. In addition to making a recording entitled The Happy Feeling, which will also be released in England, Europe and the U.S., the group’s most recent challenge was at (an) International Band Battle, where they walked away with the first prize trophy. Previous to that was a CKXL radio sponsored band battle in which 45 bands from throughout the province competed.”

Sacroiliac Boop by the Happy Feeling

Happy Feeling photoshoot on Calgary’s Crowchild Trail

The first single the band recorded was “Happy Feeling”, a psychedelic rock tune. It peaked at #1 in Calgary in November 1968. The B-side, “If There’s A Thought”, began to chart on CKXL in February 1969. It climbed to #4 on the CKXL chart in March ’69.

Their second single release in 1969 was “Hey Little Man” possessed some fine acoustic guitar. A third release in January 1970 was “Good Neighbour Day”, was described by music writer Michael Pantonin as containing “sunny Beach Boys harmonies and that curiously optimistic naivete so common at the time.” But it was their fourth single release that sent them back to the top of the charts in Calgary, “Still Hill”. The single peaked at #1 in Calgary, #3 in Medicine Hat (AB), #5 in Lethbridge (AB), the Top Ten in Peace River  (AB), and the Top 30 in Edmonton.

The Citizen Freak website notes “As a touring group, they racked up 100,000 miles per year on the road, touring with Roy Orbison, and also performing at rock concerts, festivals and one night stands. They got the nod as guest artists on many concert stages, with artists such as Three Dog Night, and Festival Express headliners The Band, Janis Joplin, and The Grateful Dead, along with many others, until they disbanded in 1971. Their recording sessions took place in Clovis, New Mexico, with the famed producer and engineer, who worked with Buddy Holly, the Fireballs, and many others, Norman Petty.”

The Happy Feeling were back in the Top Ten in Calgary in the winter of 1970 with “Sacroiliac Boop”.

Sacroiliac Boop by the Happy Feeling

“Sacroiliac Boop” was written by Gordon Moffat. The sacroiliac is a joint between the sacrum and the ilium bones of the pelvis, which are connected by strong ligaments. In humans, the sacrum supports the spine and is supported in turn by an ilium on each side. The joint is strong, supporting the entire weight of the upper body. The human body has two sacroiliac joints, one on the left and one on the right. Like most lower extremity joints, one of the sacroiliac joints’ functions is shock absorption for the spine. The young man singing the song is doing well as he walks down the street. A “boop” is a word describing a cute poke. Perhaps the singers’ sacroiliac joint has given him a poke, a “boop,” which in this case makes him feel fine – in a good healthy flow. After all, he’s “skipping down the street and walking, sacroiliac boop!” So, whatever messages he’s getting from his pelvic/hip area, he’s able to keep skipping and walking down the street with no care in the world. His pelvic region keeps giving him positive vibes. Get ready persons-of-the-opposite sex.

“Sacroiliac Boop” was actually the B-side to “Lord Come”. But the A-side failed to chart as DJs opted to spin the B-side for play on the airwaves.

“Sacroiliac Boop” peaked at #4 in Calgary, and #10 in Lethbridge, AB.

A final hit for the Happy Feeling, “Children”, peaked in the CKXL Top Ten in January 1971.

Michael Panontin, writing for Canuuckistanmusic.com, states that the Happy Feeling might be lost to obscurity, except that they recorded with Norman Petty. It was in his Clovis, New Mexico, studio that Petty recorded Roy Orbison, Waylon Jennings and Buddy Holly. Norman Petty got acquainted with some people in the music business in Alberta. This resulted in his recording Alberta recording artists Wes Dakus and the Rebels, Barry Allen, the Gainsborough Gallery, and the Happy Feeling.

In 1970 Happy Feeling received a BMI Writers Award of Distinction. The band split up in 1971.

January 20, 2024
Ray McGinnis

References:
The Happy Feeling,” Citizen Freak.
Michael Panontin, “Happy Feeling,” Canuckistanmusic.com.
Happy Feeling,” Calgary Cassette Preservation Society, May 16, 2021.
Sacroiliac joint,” Wikipedia.org.

Sacroiliac Boop by the Happy Feeling

CKXL 1140-AM Top Ten | Calgary (AB) | December 12, 1970


One response to “Sacroiliac Boop by the Happy Feeling”

  1. Richard Skelly says:

    ‘Sacroiliac’ is indeed an odd word to be in a popular song title. Thanks for explaining its meaning. One hopes at least a few inquisitive radio listeners of Sacroiliac Boop grabbed good dictionaries back in 1970 to figure things out.

    Neither B-side Sacroiliac Boop nor A-side Lord Come got a U.S. release. Two of Happy Feeling’s previous singles did: In 1968 the eponymously titled Happy Feeling b/w If There’s A Thought came out down there on Mala, a subsidiary of Bell Records; Earlier in 1970, Still Hill b/w Four O’Clock was picked up by Avco Embassy Records.

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