Gimmie Shelter by The Rolling Stones

#832: Gimmie Shelter by The Rolling Stones

Peak Month: July 1970
6 weeks on Vancouver’s CKVN chart
Peak Position #6
Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 ~ did not chart

The Rolling Stones first gig was at the Marquee Club in London on July 12, 1962. At that first show, the group was billed as the Rollin’ Stones and, of what would become the band’s original lineup, only Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and keyboardist Ian Stewart performed. Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts would formally join in January of 1963, and Stewart officially left the band in May. Though Stewart continued on as the Stones’ road manager and occasionally played with them both on stage and in the studio until his death in 1985. When the Rolling Stones began playing gigs around London in 1962, the notion that a rock & roll band would last five years, let alone fifty, was an absurdity. After all, what could possibly be more elusive than rock & roll, the latest teenage fad? Besides, other factors made it unlikely that such a momentous occasion would ever come to pass. “I didn’t expect to last until fifty myself, let alone with the Stones,” Keith Richards says with a laugh. “It’s incredible, really. In that sense we’re still living on borrowed time.”

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We Love You by Rolling Stones

#975: We Love You by Rolling Stones

Peak Month: October 1967
6 weeks on CKLG chart
Peak Position #9
Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 ~ #50

The Rolling Stones first gig was at the Marquee Club in London on July 12, 1962. At that first show, the group was billed as the Rollin’ Stones and, of what would become the band’s original lineup, only Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and keyboardist Ian Stewart performed. Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts would formally join in January of 1963, and Stewart officially left the band in May. Though Stewart continued on as the Stones’ road manager and occasionally played with them both on stage and in the studio until his death in 1985. When the nascent Rolling Stones began playing gigs around London in 1962, the notion that a rock & roll band would last five years, let alone fifty, was an absurdity. After all, what could possibly be more ephemeral than rock & roll, the latest teenage fad? Besides, other factors made it unlikely that such a momentous occasion would ever come to pass. “I didn’t expect to last until fifty myself, let alone with the Stones,” Keith Richards says with a laugh. “It’s incredible, really. In that sense we’re still living on borrowed time.”

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Under My Thumb by The Rolling Stones

#1107: Under My Thumb by The Rolling Stones

Peak Month: September 1966
6 weeks on Vancouver’s CFUN chart
Peak Position #8
Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 ~ did not chart

In 1966 the Rolling Stones released their sixth studio album, Aftermath. The album had a number of tracks on it whose subject concerned females. On the British release, side one began with “Mother’s Little Helper”, “Stupid Girl”, “Lady Jane”, and followed by “Under My Thumb”. “Mother’s Little Helper” is a song that dealt with the sudden popularity of prescribed calming drugs at the time, like valium, among housewives. The lyrics warned about the potential hazards of overdose and addiction. The lyric in “Lady Jane” depicted the humble, reverent, devoted and monogamous fiancé of Lady Jane. The North American release of Aftermath replaced “Mother’s Little Helper” with “Paint It Black”.

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Sweet Black Angel by The Rolling Stones

#1114: Sweet Black Angel by The Rolling Stones

Peak Month: May 1972
5 weeks on Vancouver’s CKVN chart
Peak Position #3
Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 ~ did not chart

“Sweet Black Angel” is a song by the Rolling Stones, featured on their 1972 album Exile on Main St. It was also released on a single as the B-side to “Tumbling Dice” prior to the album.
Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Sweet Black Angel” is one of the most political songs written by the Rolling Stones. For the most part the Rolling Stones shy away from overt political songs. Even on the their 1968 single “Street Fighting Man”, which deals with anti-war rioting of the late ’60s, Jagger sums the Stones ethos up by singing “what can a poor boy do, but sing for a rock n’ roll band.”

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